Sunday, April 1, 2012

It's Not All Rainbows and Butterflies

I feel like by running this blog I've destroyed any chance of actually being able to use Tumblr. Which is okay, because I generally don't understand it. Not just how to use it, as I discussed in the prior post, but how people think on it.


See, now I've just got Snape judging me. Apparently, talking about Tumblr is a public threat to security. Which is a damn pity, because I talk about Tumblr all the time on here. But maybe this doesn't count as the real world. Anyway, it isn't just this sort of thing that baffles me. Okay, hedgehogs and Martin Freeman aside for the moment (because Lord knows I don't understand AT ALL how that happened), there's other things that just confuse the hell out of me. Like this:


According to this posting, if you tag your opinion instead of writing it in something you're posting, it's two hundred times cooler. Which I totally don't understand from a functional aspect. Because tags are fucking hard to read (especially if they're long). And if you click on them, they do a search for related topics on Tumblr. Which is kind of pointless if your writing your opinion in tags.

But whatever, clearly I'm just some noob who doesn't understand Tumblr. And thus my opinion is irrelevant.

Other than HOW people post, WHAT they post leaves me equally confused. Like this:

Okay, as wonderful as this man is, and (my opinions aside) as funny as this hedgehog/otter business may be, was this really necessary? Really? Why? I mean, WHY? (There must be a reason, or someone found it really funny, but it's utterly lost on me. Hey, maybe it's just me).

And the list of things that people post that I don't understand could stretch on for many, many examples. But instead, I'm going to focus on something I could understand, but don't:


There was a really interesting comment to this post, one I've been striving to find and had no luck (which makes me wonder if it wasn't deleted). The commenter mentioned something along the lines of how dangerous fangirling can be - to themselves and to others, meaning that obsession can go too far and that people can actually hurt each others feelings online, either in fights between which fandoms are better or in squabbles inside fandoms about certain phenomenons. The writer articulated it much better than I can in an incredibly perceptive post and one I'm sorry I can't uncover.


http://discoverthedspot.com/blog/
While being a fangirl can be an immense amount of dedication, there's something wrong about saying it should be a job and that all fangirls "deserve to meet their idols." While being a fangirl is not all rainbows and butterflies (thank you, Maroon 5 for this lyric line I cannot get out of my head), it is also not something that is forced upon anyone; it's partly (if not mostly) a choice. No one made be me a fangirl; it just sort of happened. Do I deserve compensation for that? No. Do I want it? Yep, but it doesn't mean I feel I have to have it. Do I think fangirls should have the opportunity to meet the people they admire? Absolutely? Do they deserve it? I don't know. Something about the word "deserve" puts me off, as if fangirls are owed something for their devotion. I mean, I love it when actors and musicians are really appreciative of their fans, that's wonderful. I just think it's going too far to say that actors and musicians owe such an unpayable debt. It's not that I'm acting out of jealousy (ala if I think my dreams won't come true then no one's can!), it's more that I feel it's an immense request to put on actors/musicians, one that asks something of them that they may feel driven to give but unable to.

And while I'm professing my particularity for word choice in this post, I don't like the use of the word idol. Why? It's too...  well, I was raised Roman Catholic so this definition comes to mind first: "an image of a representation of a god used as an object of worship." Which, you know, is a bit off-setting. I feel like it's another move towards forgetting that actors/musicians are people too and just seeing them as objects of worship, when they are so, so much more than that. But I could spend the rest of the night talking about the objectification of celebrities. So for now we'll end it here. Along with this, a fangirl's motivation to get off Tumblr and do homework:

Of course, this sort of motivation utterly backfires for me. It just sends me here :) My apologies, Mr. Freeman.

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